Category: Hospice Care

Federal government tightening enforcement for hospice, post-acute care providers

By Curtis Campbell, Class of 2019; Jessie C. Neil, Partner at Waller; J. Logan Wilson, Associate at Waller

The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently announced that it had found several vulnerabilities in the Medicare hospice program while examining practices between 2006 and 2016.

The number of beneficiaries in the program expanded 53 percent between these dates, growing from 930,000 beneficiaries in 2006 to 1.4 million beneficiaries in 2016. However, spending in the same period grew 81 percent, increasing from $9.2 billion in 2006 to $16.7 billion in 2016. The number of hospices also increased 43 percent, growing from 3,062 in 2006 to 4,374 in 2016.

Beneficiaries of the program forgo curative care for terminal illnesses and instead receive palliative care. Palliative care can be provided in a variety of settings, including the patient’s home, a nursing facility, a hospital or a hospice inpatient unit. Medicare pays hospices for each day a beneficiary receives care, regardless of the quantity or quality of services. Medicare pays a different daily rate for four (4) different levels of hospice care: routine home care, general inpatient care, continuous home care and inpatient respite care.

While conducting its examination, OIG concluded that hospices did not always provide necessary services to beneficiaries. In some cases, hospices did not manage patients’ symptoms or medications effectively, leaving them in pain for many days. Additionally, OIG found that hospices often did a poor job care planning, that hundreds of hospices only offered routine home care, that many hospices did not offer services on the weekend, and that many beneficiaries did not see a physician. Some beneficiaries and their families and caregivers also did not receive critical information needed to make informed decisions about the care the beneficiary received.

OIG also identified issues with hospices inappropriately billing costs and higher-than-appropriate levels of care to Medicare worth hundreds of millions of dollars. OIG noted several fraudulent activities, including enrolling beneficiaries who are not eligible for hospice care and billing for services that were never provided.

Furthermore, OIG found that the current payment system incentivizes hospices to minimize patient services and seek beneficiaries who have uncomplicated needs. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has made some changes to the payment system, but the underlying structure remains unchanged.

As a result, OIG made several recommendations to CMS about how to improve the hospice program, including:

  • Strengthening the survey process to better ensure that hospices provide beneficiaries with needed services and quality care;
  • Seeking statutory authority to establish remedies for hospices with poor performance;
  • Developing and disseminating additional information on hospices to help beneficiaries and their families and caregivers make informed choices about their care;
  • Educating beneficiaries and their families and caregivers about the hospice benefit;
  • Promoting physician involvement and accountability to ensure that beneficiaries get appropriate care;
  • Strengthening oversight of hospices to reduce inappropriate billing; and
  • Taking steps to tie payment to beneficiary care needs and quality of care to ensure that services rendered adequately serve beneficiaries’ needs, seeking statutory authority if needed.

OIG is telegraphing its intent to focus enforcement efforts around hospice care in particular and post-acute care in general. Companies with a proactive compliance program will wisely adapt their processes to reflect these new government priorities.